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Information for Visitor
Exposition
Exhibitions
Cultural, educational
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Railway Museum. Photo: A. Usonienė

Railway Museum. Photo: A. Usonienė

Railway Museum. Photo: S. Saveljevo

Railway Museum. Photo: A. Usonienė
Railway Museum. Photo: Tomas Kapočius
Railway Museum. Photo: Tomas Kapočius
Railway Museum. Photo: Tomas Kapočius
Railway Museum. Photo: Tomas Kapočius
Railway Museum. Photo: Tomas Kapočius
Railway Museum. Photo: Aleksas Pielikis
Railway Museum. Photo: Tomas Kapočius
Railway Museum. Photo: Aleksas Pielikis
Railway Museum. Photo: Tomas Kapočius
Railway Museum. Photo: Tomas Kapočius

railway Museum

Contacts
Address: Geležinkelio g. 16, LT-01047, Vilnius.
Tel.: (+370 ~ 5) 269 37 41.
E-mail: muziejus[at]litrail.lt; v.lapeniene[at]litrail.lt;
Director – Vitalija Lapėnienė.

Information for Visitor
Tuesday to Friday 9–17, Saturday 9–16.
Closed on Sunday, Monday, National Holiday Eve, the last Friday of the month.

Admission:
adults – 1,20 €
pupils, students and OAP – 0,65 €
excursion – 9 €
groups (up to 5 persons) – 4,50 €
child under 7, disabled, ICOM member – free.

Exposition

The purpose of the Railway Museum is to collect, preserve and promote the museum’s valuables related to the history of railways and the activities of Lietuvos Geležinkeliai (Lithuanian Railways).
The Railway Museum is located on the second floor of the Vilnius railway station, a historic building built in 1861. The museum occupies three halls. These are three main visitor-oriented areas: information (exhibition hall), cultural (exhibitions) and educational (models hall).
The exhibition in the main museum hall is arranged according to themes: travel, communications, road construction, rolling stock, railway signalling, builders and workers.
The beginning of the exhibition acquaints visitors with the history of railway stations. There are photos of first railway stations in Lithuania and authentic rail travel attributes: trunks placed on authentic shelves from diesel train D1, signs of luggage porters who worked at stations, dishes from passenger carriages of different periods, an old ticket safe and other related exhibits.
The history of railways is closely related with the history of communications, which is reflected in the Morse telegraph apparatus of 1916 and 1923, and bimetallic wire from the Kaišiadorys-Liepoja railway section (1871) telegraph line. Wire telegraph connecting railway stations was installed after building the railway in Lithuania in the 19th century. Turmantas, Dūkštas, Ignalina, Švenčionėliai, Vilnius, Lentvaris, Kaunas, Virbalis and other stations had telegraphers as soon as in 1865. The telegraph service also took care of telephone communications at the stations. Telephone communications were established on the railways at the start of the 20th century. Local battery telephones, a telephone switch, a telephone hub, a postal correspondence stamping (marking) machine (1957) and other authentic exhibits capture the attention of visitors.
The history of railways is primarily the history of railway construction reflected in old tools of railway workers: a pickaxe, an axe for hewing sleepers, tongs for lifting sleepers and hammers. Surveying instruments – an old theodolite (1912) and a dumpy level (1940) – are standing next to them. Visitors can “try” a manual saw machine and a manual drill machine. Track fasteners – screws and elastic springs, spikes (and a spike hammer-puller) and other track fasteners as well as markers indicating the year of laying sleepers (1909-1965) – are arranged on glass shelves. This year, Algimantas Norvilas, a March 11 Act signatory, presented the Railway Museum with a collection of fragments of railway tracks including exhibits dating back to 1870. The collection is exhibited on rubble next to a railway handcar standing on rails.
The main facts of the history of Lithuanian railways are recorded in a 20-metre timeline. Events are illustrated by copies of photographs and rolling stock exhibits arranged on a stand. These are an old steam engine buffer, a helical carriage connecting mechanism, handmade locomotive engineer’s toolboxes, grease boxes, a locomotive engineer’s bag, which is more than 100 years old (it was used by three generations of one family of railway workers). A fragment of the narrow gauge railway track of the Kaunas fortress and other authentic exhibits are interesting as well.
The history of the rail transport signalling system can be studied interactively. During a demonstration of the operation of crooked staff system (1949–1958) and a switching mechanism, visitors become “signalmen and switchmen” and can contact a “post duty officer” using a local battery telephone in a level crossing controller’s house.
Information on railway builders and workers is provided by uniform insignias, uniforms and their elements, railway workers’ honours and education documents of different periods.  The chief’s office containing exhibits of different railway history periods adds variety to the exhibition.
The smallest museum visitors will enjoy the models hall with three operational railway models. We will teach them to control one of them according to signalling rules. The other two will help to learn about the railway structure: railways, bridges, tunnels, buildings, signalling and rolling stock. Educational programmes for pupils are conducted in this hall.
The exhibition hall hosts various exhibitions, book presentations, film shows and various cultural events. 

Exhibitions
The museum arranges occasional exhibitions dedicated to Lithuanian railway history.

Cultural, educational activity
Organizing competitions;
Organizing occasional events.

Other news
The museum was founded in 1966. The founder of the museum is Georgijus Žemaitis, the railway man.

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© Lithuanian Art Museum, © Association of Lithuanian Museums. ISSN 1648-8857 Page updated 24.05.2017
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